Archive: » 2018 » April

Help Save the Birds at the Caroni Cat Sanctuary!

For those of you who think I've gotten the title mixed up, well there's much to talk about. Firstly, I must admit that the inspiration for the title of this piece comes from an article that was published recently, check it out here. The anonymous author makes reference to yours truly regarding some comments I supposedly made. The original post is here, have a read and freely compare both passages. What's really going on is this: There is an existing population of feral cats at the Caroni Bird Sanctuary. Most of us are familiar with the Caroni Bird Sanctuary, either you've been there before...

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Studying Birds: Ruby Topaz

It's been many years since I was first blown away by the brilliance of a male Ruby Topaz, that flash of bright red and gold while feeding an early morning in one of Trinidad's southern wetlands back in 2011. Coming from such a dull, dark brown bird it was (and still is) nothing short of plain amazing. But for most of that time, I haven't had much good luck with this bird, only securing one or two decent shots over the years. After photographing it at its most resplendent (see here) I realized that the most interesting aspect of this transformation is not the end product, but the journey itself...

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A Little Heavy On The Cute

There are many descriptive words used to portray birds as we see them, however simplistic or fanciful we perceive them to be. Few words are as over-used as "cute", though. And for good reason, as birds are covered in well, something terribly soft and delicate that they can make even fluffier than usual at will. Chilly weather encourages this behaviour, as the extra air within the feathers acts as an insulator. This Black-faced Grassquit was feeling mighty chilled on an unusually biting morning at Cuffie River, halfway up to Main Ridge Forest Reserve. After having clear weather for a few days,...

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On the Edge

I love it when good birds turn up in unexpected places. Honestly though, a roadside puddle isn't that surprising of an avian attraction. Birds love to bathe, and even after a shower of rain, they may still jump in a puddle and have a little fun. Some years ago, I stumbled upon a puddle bath that was being attended by at least five Yellow Warblers, two Prothonatary Warblers and a Grey Seedeater! That sighting of the Grey Seedeater was my only sighting of this bird in the wild, a former common resident but now only seen in cages across the country. A relative of the two aforementioned Warblers...

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